Dress Like a Suffragist!

 Women's Suffrage group at headquarters, Wash DC, 1917 

Women's Suffrage group at headquarters, Wash DC, 1917 

Are you interested in dressing like a suffragist and marching with us in the upcoming 19th Amendment Centennial Celebrations? If you haven't delved into historic clothing before, the late Edwardian Era is an easy place to start. Here are a few tips to help you get started.  

  • Round brimmed hats with simple trim were common.
  • Blouses had long or 3/4 length sleeves and wide collars. Shawl and sailor collars were popular.
  • Ladies wore ankle length a-line style skirts with stockings.
  • When walking outdoors a lady would wear  walking boots. For our purposes a pair of plain comfortable flats will do.
  • Ladies wore very little jewelry due to funds being put toward the war effort. Simple brooches and costume jewelry became fashionable. 
  • Hair was styled into a loose low bun.
  • For cooler weather events ladies would wear long belted wool coats often with fur accessories (faux fur is recommend) including muffs and stoles
  • There are many photos online of ladies in 1918-1920 and beautiful fashion plates- just remember marching clothing was practical and comfortable!
 Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, 1921  / Women's Suffrage Group at Headquarters, Wash DC, 1918

Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, 1921  / Women's Suffrage Group at Headquarters, Wash DC, 1918

We are planning meetings throughout the year for ladies and gentleman interested in participating in upcoming Women's Suffrage Centennial Events. For more in depth clothing / fashion guides, email updates and more information about local meet-ups sign up for the Mourning Society: St Louis Suffrage League

Don't miss out on our next event (as either a participant or a spectator) To Ask For Freedom at Bellefontaine Cemetery on Saturday July 14, 2018 at 2pm.  Activities will include a march, the singing of suffrage songs and a rally celebrating the words of famous St Louis Suffrage leaders such as Virginia Minor, the first president of the Woman's Suffrage Association of Missouri, Edna Gellhorn, organizer of the 1916 Golden Lane Protest, and Florence Wyman Richardson, the first president of the St. Louis Equal Suffrage League. This event is free and open to the public but registration is required - We will update this event with a link once registration is open.

Check this event out on Facebook!