3 Missouri Suffrage Facts

...you may have never heard before.

 Gov. Gardner of Missouri signing resolution ratifying amendment to U.S. Constitution, Library of Congress

Gov. Gardner of Missouri signing resolution ratifying amendment to U.S. Constitution, Library of Congress

  1. The Women’s Suffrage Association of Missouri was created on May 8, 1867 by ladies who had learned the ropes of managing an organization through their involvement with the Ladies Union Aid Society during the Civil War.
  2. The Equal Suffrage League of St Louis was founded on April 10, 1910 following renewed interest in the cause. They were responsible for some of the largest organized protests in St Louis including National Suffrage Day in April 1914 and the Golden Lane Protest in June 1916.
  3. On July 3, 1919 Missouri became the eleventh state to ratify the Susan B Anthony Amendment granting women the right to vote. It was one of the US states that did so within the first month after Congress passed the Amendment and had passed it's own state level suffrage bill earlier that March. The state bill was passed on the last day of the Jubilee Convention of the National American Women Suffrage Association, which was being held at the Hotel Statler in St Louis, Missouri.
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Find out even more about the women's suffrage movement at our next event To Ask for Freedom at Bellefontaine Cemetery on July 14, 2018 at 2:00 pm.

We are looking for more suffragists and suffra-gents to march with us at events throughout 2018-2020. Sign-up online for our e-newsletter and get an invitation to our private Facebook Group or reach out to us if you have any questions.

We also have an easy guide to help you get started.

Dress Like a Suffragist!

 Women's Suffrage group at headquarters, Wash DC, 1917 

Women's Suffrage group at headquarters, Wash DC, 1917 

Are you interested in dressing like a suffragist and marching with us in the upcoming 19th Amendment Centennial Celebrations? If you haven't delved into historic clothing before, the late Edwardian Era is an easy place to start. Here are a few tips to help you get started.  

  • Round brimmed hats with simple trim were common.
  • Blouses had long or 3/4 length sleeves and wide collars. Shawl and sailor collars were popular.
  • Ladies wore ankle length a-line style skirts with stockings.
  • When walking outdoors a lady would wear  walking boots. For our purposes a pair of plain comfortable flats will do.
  • Ladies wore very little jewelry due to funds being put toward the war effort. Simple brooches and costume jewelry became fashionable. 
  • Hair was styled into a loose low bun.
  • For cooler weather events ladies would wear long belted wool coats often with fur accessories (faux fur is recommend) including muffs and stoles
  • There are many photos online of ladies in 1918-1920 and beautiful fashion plates- just remember marching clothing was practical and comfortable!
 Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, 1921  / Women's Suffrage Group at Headquarters, Wash DC, 1918

Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, 1921  / Women's Suffrage Group at Headquarters, Wash DC, 1918

We are planning meetings throughout the year for ladies and gentleman interested in participating in upcoming Women's Suffrage Centennial Events. For more in depth clothing / fashion guides, email updates and more information about local meet-ups sign up for the Mourning Society: St Louis Suffrage League

Don't miss out on our next event (as either a participant or a spectator) To Ask For Freedom at Bellefontaine Cemetery on Saturday July 14, 2018 at 2pm.  Activities will include a march, the singing of suffrage songs and a rally celebrating the words of famous St Louis Suffrage leaders such as Virginia Minor, the first president of the Woman's Suffrage Association of Missouri, Edna Gellhorn, organizer of the 1916 Golden Lane Protest, and Florence Wyman Richardson, the first president of the St. Louis Equal Suffrage League. This event is free and open to the public but registration is required - We will update this event with a link once registration is open.

Check this event out on Facebook!

We need you!

Help celebrate the centennial of the key years of the Women's Suffrage Movement from 1918 to 1920 with us! We are looking for ladies and gentleman to participate in living history events over the next few years culminating in the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th amendment.

 

Click here to find out how you can sign-up for events!

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If you are interested in historic clothing, the early 20th century is an easy and inexpensive place to start plus you'll have the opportunity to learn more about the national fight for the right to vote and the women of Missouri who led the way! You can learn more about the movement and the fashions of 1918 at our next event:

WWI, Wilson and Women's Suffrage at Jefferson Barracks - While the United States was entrenched in WWI, women waged their own war at home marching for the right to vote! Learn how St. Louis women were involved in this struggle, and how you can put together an era- appropriate outfit to join in upcoming events as we forge ahead to 2020 and the 100th anniversary of the 19th amendment. 

Free to the public - Join this event on Facebook

So, what does this have to do with mourning? Nothing at all! The Mourning Society started recruiting ladies to interpret the St Louis Golden Lane Protest of 1916 for Bellefontaine Cemetery's 2016 Decoration Day Event. We had a great response and it was so much fun that we decided to look for more events we could participate in. It also gives us a chance to do something outside of our usual busy season in the fall.

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The Mourning Society has participated in Bellefontaine Cemetery's 2016 Decoration Day, The League of Women Voters Celebrate the Vote and we've created our own program To Ask For Freedom: 100 Years of Women's Suffrage celebrating the words of famous St Louis Suffrage leaders such as Edna Gellhorn, organizer of the 1916 Golden Lane Protest, and Florence Wyman Richardson, the first president of the St. Louis Equal Suffrage League.

If you would like us to participate in an upcoming event you can contact us here or through our Facebook Page.

Join the Suffrage Cause!

The Mourning Society of St Louis is participating in To Ask For Freedom: The Fight for Women’s Suffrage on Saturday July 1 at 10AM at Bellefontaine Cemetery!

We are looking for like-minded ladies and gentleman who would like to dress in 1917 attire and march with us to celebrate 100 years of the Women’s Suffrage Movement and the Suffragists of Bellefontaine Cemetery.

It is astonishingly easy to put together a 1917 style outfit from things found in vintage shops, thrift stores or even items you may already have in your closet! This is also a great way to get started if you are interested in historic clothing and reenacting without making a big investment.

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This is the first of what we hope will be a series of Women’s Suffrage events culminating in a Centennial Celebration of the ratification of the 19th Amendment in 2020.

To register for this event as a participant and find out more about putting together a 1917 ensemble please Contact Us.

If you are interested in attending this event as a spectator click here to register for this free event!

Upcoming Event! To Ask For Freedom

 Photo from the Library of Congress

Photo from the Library of Congress

Ask For Freedom: The Fight For Women's Suffrage - Saturday July 1

Join us for this living history event celebrating the Women's Suffrage Movement and the Suffragists of Bellefontaine Cemetery! The ladies will begin their march at 10:00 am and make their way to Wild Wood Valley for a rally celebrating the words of famous St Louis Suffrage leaders such as Edna Gellhorn, organizer of the 1916 Golden Lane Protest, and Florence Wyman Richardson, the first president of the St. Louis Equal Suffrage League.

After the rally,  guests are free to visit with the ladies of the St Louis Suffrage Movement and learn more about national events 100 years ago.

Space is limited and reservations are required.  To assist with traffic and parking at the event space, we ask that you choose between two arrival times – 9:30 AM or 10:00 AM. Click here to register.

 

 

Enlist Now!

We are recruiting like-minded suffragists to march with us during this 1917 interpretation. To sign-up as a participant or if you have questions about getting started wearing historic clothing please reach out to us though our Contact page.

Suffragists Needed!

The Mourning Society of St Louis is participating in the Celebrate the Vote Festival on September 3, 2016 and we are looking for fellow suffragists who would like to join us dressed in 1916 attire to celebrate the 100 year anniversary of the Golden Lane Protest here in St. Louis.

It is astonishingly easy to put together a 1916 style outfit from things found in local vintage shops, thrift stores, or even items you may already have in your closet.

This is a good introduction into historic clothing for anyone who is interested but not ready to make a big commitment. We can help with any questions you may have.

Just like the 1916 protest, suffragists should wear white or cream 1916 era clothing. Ladies should wear a hat, gloves and stockings. We are already scandalizing everyone by asking to vote - so please cover your head or you may end up getting arrested! Shoes can be either period appropriate styles or plain modern flats.

The ladies of the Golden Lane carried yellow parasols. This is optional of course but who doesn’t like carrying a parasol?

Want to sign up to join us the day of the event or have a bunch of questions? Contact us here.

For ideas and inspiration check out our 1916 Golden Lane Pinterest Board

For more information about the Celebrate the Vote Festival click here